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the lawful property of southern families, namely their slaves. and there was no compromise that could erase those tensions. they had been trying to compromise the issue of slavery for three generations. they compromised over slavery when they wrote the constitution. they compromised over slavery when they passed the northwest -- opening the upper midwest. they compromised over slavery in 1820 with the famous missouri compromise. they compromised over slavery in 1850 with the fugitive slave act and in 1854 with the kansas/nebraska act. the dred scott opinion of the supreme court was supposed to be compromised, resolving the issue of slavery. they had tried and tried and tried to compromise. it had not worked and that is why the crisis came. if one nation sharing the same congress, operating under the same laws, could not compromise the issue, how could two nations side-by-side, sharing these vital arteries of commerce and communication, how could they hope to resolve the issue? and what's more, lincoln understood that if secession managed one success there would not be illogical into it. we
there, you have to enforce the law. but you have now, and i don't blame people who show up here. if we refuse to control the border and identify who you are and refuse to police ourselves refuse to do everything if you're here illegally, it's hard for me to tell you you're or taken advantage of the richest venture in the world. he seems to be saying please come and exploit me. to some extent we have to reestablish the rule of law. the only point to try to make during the debate that had a significant impact on our side in solidifying the degree to which people adopt positions that made no sense. two points. one is for not going to deport grandmother's. some of you may disagree with that, but if you look at this country as a whole, the idea behind grandmother's, the churches will protect them. their families will protect them. and they cannot pin. conservatives should not write laws that are fantasies. i didn't say i'm for people who come here illegally, but i'm prefiguring out a patch of residency to get them to pay taxes, get them to be within the law, get them to be not exploited and
family. in the middle, to older folks in the middle on the left is jim's attire from his father-in-law and next to him, his wife, rio, bill manbo's mother-in-law. they were both immigrants from japan. trained as a mechanical draftsman, but did a number of different jobs and he came to the united states and ultimately took up farming in the mid-1920s in the work of the california, southeast of downtown los angeles. they had three children. on the right is the youngest child. that is eunice. she was about 16% even this photograph. on the other hand on the left is mary, who then became mary manbo. on the left is the photographer's wife, mary manbo. and then is bill and mary sun, really. also called bill, that he was called billy and the family. he came in 1940s if this is some 10 shots in 1943. is three years old touching his toy airplane. mary went to the frank wiggins school as well. she was studying to become a seamstress. she became a seamstress and it's costing design for theater come any among other jobs. and there was a third child, a boy. by 1941, cne who is not pictured in this p
obamacare for her. spent and this is for my mother-in-law. we take very good care of the women. >> this corrects the history on 200 years. >> what a pleasure. keep up the great work. >> thank you so much. thank you for coming. hello. >> [inaudible] >> or he will take his job. >> there you go. [inaudible] >> how do you know kelly? >> [inaudible] >> you are here in d.c.? >> yeah, yeah. >> she is my favorite surgeon. it really nice to meet you. stay on this side. if we start a trend it will take too long. and by the way, my handwriting was a little worse because i was writing while i was taking the picture. did it come out of? >> i have no idea. >> you're going to love it. thank you. >> i have to, one for me, one for my and. -- my aunt. >> did i spell that wrong? >> no, that's perfect. >> thank you. thank you for coming. >> yeah. >> keep them moving here. >> hi, my name is john. >> nice to meet you, john. [inaudible] >> it's a timely book, that's why there's a few typos in it. your name is john? >> john. >> so why did you leave oklahoma? there's a lot of oil out there. you just ca
in the development of international refugee law policy. the international office of refugees who won the 1938 nobel peace prize. he yearns to -- diaspora and he was the russians could do something that can to the inspiring recent flight across the atlantic. in 1928 he decided it was up to him to do a tattered to mail in equivalent to go around the world alone by bicycle. luckily he didn't have to do that. he departed shanghai on a better bicycle but upgraded to a new bicycle in bangkok into a secondhand motorcycle in singapore. the benefactor gave him a brand-new aeriel motorcycle in karachi plus a letter the guaranteed parts and assistance in aerial offices around the world. in his published a county think the worldwide services of the ymca ,-com,-com ma shell oil and the firestone company and he depended on the global availability of gasoline, oil and food. the array of industry of good services that were now spread almost everywhere in the world. like the circumspect wing south asian diaspora he made his transit with think richmond of scattered white russians. above all there was his passport fo
. and the americans were skeptical. first, there were neutrality laws but there were also very strong isolationist sentiment in america. and even george marshall, who was chief military advisor to franklin roosevelt said, how can we send all these weapons to england if they're going to surrender to the british in a matter of weeks, and we end up fighting the germans? we will be charging into the face of our own weapons. but even though the operation was secret, it became headlines of course when it happened around the world. and everyone knew about it. and roosevelt and marshall were very, very effected by this. they thought if the british government can do this, they are serious. they are not going to negotiate with the germans. they're going to stay in this for as long as they possibly can. and it opened up the pathway for armaments to go to britain, which were very much needed and very much appreciated. >> brooke stoddard, when the official date of the so-called battle for britain, battle of britain? >> when were they? i think britain calls it july to the end of september, let's say. >> of 1940
, unlike the skip tracers and bag men who, in mr. leonard's work, usually represent the law and order history. raylan is an anacreonism for town, and he shows what mr. leonard holds dear, the values he can common in different american rhythm. those of, for instance, richard ford or robert frost or even mark twain. this is a quote. please concentrate... you can cut official corners to call a man out but couldn't walk in a man's house unless ininvited or else with a warrant. it was the way he was raced, with good manners. back when he was living in the coal camp and miners struck, raylan walking a picket line, his dad in the house dying of black lung, and a couple came across the street, with pick handles, and walked up to where his mother was on the porch. they said they wanted to speak to her brother. she told them, you don't walk in a person's home unless your invited, even you people must believe that. you have homes, don't you? wifes and mothers keeping house? they shoved her aside and hit raylan with a pick handle to put him down. her words hadn't stopped them. what they did was s
and the next election, jackson had gone around the country, building a popular majority in getting laws changed from state to state to state in which providing for universal white male suffrage, which took a vote out of the hands of property owners and give it to barbarians as john quincy adams may say. the bank if there was a deal with clay in 1824, was that ethical bystanders of those days and retrospectively by our standards? >> is certainly what is ethical in those days. he took a lot of flak for it, but the choice in his mind was to turn the country over to a barbarians who couldn't write his name, who had violated the constitution that will turn the word of 1812, con into massacre in the seminal sender and enduring whatever he felt like doing. he did not want to see this man president. >> one point in the book he described a bit of a crouch. teaching to afflict him as a person? >> yes. >> there is some time travel involved. >> all of us are brooches at times. he did not suffer fools, so you would be grouchy. i was grouchy last night when romney said we have fewer ships today than we had i
censor laws in hollywood had rotted will rogers would then departing cabinet and kennedy now positioned himself as the non-jew and made himself indispensable to the industry as such. studio after studio hired him. at one point herein for major studios in at each of those he demanded to be paid in stock options. the time he left hollywood, he was a multimillionaire and he knew how to manipulate the stock options. he knew how to turn those pieces of paper into dollars, millions of dollars and he did. at age 50 learned how to make an advantage the disadvantage and had this millions and millions and millions of dollars. at age 50 he knew how the stock market were permanently stocks and bonds are treated and he knew the crash is coming up or that all his money so when the crash did come coming here is blessed with his million and extraordinary positions. and yet, with that crash will recess. from the recession now. we all know people who are suffering, but it doesn't compare to the depression of the 30s. kennedy was scared to death at everything but the country he loved because it had given
they are raising children or they are teaching or practicing law or convenient position or going to africa have a feeling that what they are doing is going to change someone's life even if it is just one. i think writing is a wonderful way to do that. >> thank you. >> we have time for one more question. >> my name is warren graham. a disclaimer. i am a graduate of the university of buffalo. you talk about dealing with a real character, i was very much can -- i recently read it, your treatment of a young churchill in the man from st. petersburg and how richly developed that character and wondered what your sources were. >> if you want to write about churchill, the amount of material is enormous. there is loads of stuff. one of them--one of the most famous people in history. if there is any difficulty it is not finding material but shifting the week from the chaff. he wrote a great deal himself and i think you get the most vivid sense of the character from his own riding, the kind -- the majestic prose, the clever words, the way he will switch, he will start a rather ponderous sentence and end wi
into law -- created the environmental protection agency. one of the first orders of business of the ecb the a was to ban a series of insecticides starting with ddt and including all of its cousins, many of which were more toxic than ddt. the domestic ban went into effect in 1972. began phasing them out and it is too bad carson didn't live to see that but she didn't and i like to think of her in this photograph taken by her friends the freeman family who lived next door to her in maine on the shoreline of southport island in 1955, of my favorite photographs of her. she looks very content in this picture and someone who was at home in that environment and at home in the world and at home in her role as an author, scientist and ultimately somebody who would change the way we think about things. that is a good place to stop and take any questions you have. >> anybody have any questions? >> why was the book called "silent spring"? >> why was the book called "silent spring"? that probably stems from the opening chapter in which she described a spring in which the birds are absent from the tow
, i don't know when it came to me. once it came to me, i had to write it. >> host: now, you're a law professor at yale as well; correct? >> guest: yeah. >> host: the courtroom drama part, did that come easy to you? >> guest: well, i don't know, for me, no novel's refuel easy to write, but it is true, this fit into the interests of the scholar. i write about presidential power and war power and lincoln over the years, and so taking those questions, those ideas, putting them to fiction, if you think about it, lincoln did things in the civil war that raised interesting questions like extend the writ of habeas corpus, luck up journalists critical of the war and rejected the military's court marshall. my notion was what if the impeachment process be used for political reasons, nevertheless dredge up things done in the war as a way to get him out of the way. >> now, from a historically accurate point of view, how much political pressure was abraham lincoln under in early 1865? >> you know, lincoln was thee most talented politician, i believe, who ever inhabited -- well, not the oval office
's nullification of federal law. henry clay was a grand, remarkable man, and he never want to say no when he was invited to speak, to seek political attention. so we returned to washington and let the debate for seven months, attempting to persuade congressmen from the right and left in the south and the north to agree to a grande cup of ice, a grand bargain if you like, that would solve the slavery question once and for all. he failed. henry clay was pivotal to the debate but he failed in actually making a compromise real. he had put together one of the first omnibus bills and american political history, the omnibus collapsed. what happened? stephen a. douglas noted journalists at the time as a steam engine and bridges, very short, ferocious northern democrat come youngest man in the senate, 35, the marco rubio of his day perhaps, did what clay had not done. he did the numbers. in other words, what stephen a. douglas determined was that there were enough combination of votes in the senate to pass the different parts of clay's compromise, but not all at once. so they passed separate bills. u
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13